King + King Architects

For 155 years, King + King has been serving the Upstate New York area by building outstanding client relationships and creating award-winning designs. Founded in 1868 by Architect Archimedes Russell, we take pride in our distinction as the oldest architectural firm in the state. History is not something to be taken lightly and throughout ours, we have helped shape not only the city that we call home, but also assisted in creating some of the earliest buildings around Central New York.  For decades King + King’s staying power has been a direct result of our firm’s ability to adapt to the changing needs of our clients and our profession. 

Today, our focus is with spaces where people work, live, learn, play, and heal.  Client service is always at the forefront of our design process.  We believe that great solutions come from great communication and our design teams are dedicated listeners, eager to work closely with clients and understand their needs to determine the most effective and creative design solutions. In every project we undertake, we strive to make your vision a reality.  We are committed to building relationships as well as buildings.

Our History

2023
Kelly Covert
Kelly Covert

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL | 2023 – PRESENT Kelly Joined King + King Architects in 2021 as a Senior Project Manager starting our Structural Design arm of our firm.  He brings over 25 years of experience in to his position.

2022
Sara Sturtz
Sara Sturtz

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL | 2022 – PRESENT We are pleased to announce the promotion of Sara Sturtz, RA to Associate Principal. Sara has been with the firm since 2009 and brings over 13 years of professional experience to her role. Sara has a deep bench of work across all markets at the firm, focusing on the Commercial Market while supporting our Higher Education and Healthcare Markets.

Phil Squadrito
Phil Squadrito

PARTNER | 2022 – PRESENT Announcing Phil Squadrito as the newest partner in the firm. For over 23 years Phil has made significant contributions as a Project Manager and most recently Associate Principal. He primarily works in the K-12 market creating innovative spaces for students to collaborate and learn. Phil’s positive attitude on mentoring staff and developing client relationships is a contributing factor to his success. He is a registered architect and member of the American Institute of Architects.

2020
SHANNON MASTRO
SHANNON MASTRO

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL | 2020 – PRESENT As King + King Architects embarks on its one hundred fifty third year in practice, we are pleased to announce the promotion of Shannon Mastro, AIA to Associate Principal. Shannon has been with the firm since 2014, was named Project Manager in October of 2018, and brings 10 years of professional experience to her new role.

2018
150TH ANNIVERSARY
150TH ANNIVERSARY

150TH MILESTONES: 67 members of the dream team and growing. Initiated $25,000 Community Foundation Endowment. Installation of solar carport and car charging stations – providing over 90% of our building’s electrical needs. Serving over 75 clients on 300 active projects. K2 Golf Classics have raised over $150,000 in our 150th anniversary year!

PHIL SQUADRITO
PHIL SQUADRITO

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL | 2018 – PRESENT Philip Squadrito, AIA has been named associate principal at King + King Architects. Squadrito is a project manager specializing in K-12 design and joined the firm in 1999. He is a graduate of Onondaga Community College and a member of the American Institute of Architects.

2014
THE NEXT GENERATION
THE NEXT GENERATION

JASON BENEDICT, KERRY TAROLLI, AND CHAD ROGERS In November 2014 we celebrated the announcement of three new Partners. Jason, Chad and Kerry embody the vision and values of the founding fathers. Their commitment to high design, client service, employee satisfaction and community involvement speaks to the integrity of our firm.

2007
A BOLD MOVE
A BOLD MOVE

Focused on starting a new chapter in our firm’s history, in 2007 we looked at many neighborhoods all deserving of a catalyst to help fuel economic growth. The message of revitalization from the Near Westside Initiative, Connective Corridor, and Syracuse University aligned with our values and vision. Believing in the mission to help regenerate the Near Westside, our firm made the commitment to call this community home, in hopes of joining the initiative to return this neighborhood back to its glory of a once vivacious and economically vital part of Central New York.

2001
KIRK NARBURGH
KIRK NARBURGH

PARTNER | 2001 – PRESENT The second addition to the King + King team in the late 80’s was Kirk Narburgh, who started as an intern in 1988. He worked his way up to Partner in 2001. Kirk is currently the firm’s Managing Partner + CEO focusing in the education market.

1992
DAVID JOHNSON
DAVID JOHNSON

PARTNER | 1992 – 2019 David Johnson joined the firm in 1985, Dave spent most of his career specializing in healthcare planning and design. He led the King + King healthcare team as a Partner since 1992.

1987
THE GALLERIES
THE GALLERIES

The Galleries project was part of a new phase of urban renewal and revitalization of the city’s urban center after a decade or so of decay. King + King teamed with Joseph Bogdan Associates of Toronto Canada as the local architect to design the striking 120,000 sq. ft. building of glass and steel for mixed use/retail space. The building included a series of brick arches to add a historic architectural element that paid tribute to the historic buildings around it.

1984
FOURTH GENERATION PARTNERS
FOURTH GENERATION PARTNERS

King and King’s past, present, and future are captured in this 1984 photograph. Pete King, Bob Secor, Jim King, and Russ King stand in front of Archimedes Russell’s iconic Crouse College in 1984.

1982
CHANGES IN MANLIUS
CHANGES IN MANLIUS

When Manlius dedicated a new Municipal Building in October 1941, the brick structure housed the village office, the library, the fire department and police force with the public works on the lower level at the rear. The building, at the junction of Washington and Seneca St., replaced the Presbyterian church that had been on the property since 1816. The seraph that had topped the church was saved by the Manlius village clerk, Dee Smith, and put on top of the new building. After the Village Centre was created in the former Manlius Elementary school near the Swan Pond, the building on Washington St. was sold in 1982 for $250,000. Remodeled for offices and landscaped, it was owned by King and King Architects and a portion was rented to DeWitt Real Estate.

1972
BIRD LIBRARY
BIRD LIBRARY

Built at a cost of $13 million, Ernest S. Bird library was a visionary project directed by Russ King. Prior to construction, he and others toured campuses across the country in an effort to find something that would distinguish the new library. 298,000 square feet of cast-in-place concrete gives the building what King has called “a brutal style.” It was the culmination of an incredibly long and fruitful relationship between Chancellor William Tolley and King and King. As the campus has expanded, Bird has become the heart of the S.U. campus geographically.

1960
MANLEY FIELD HOUSE
MANLEY FIELD HOUSE

This photo was taken in the summer of 1960 as work on Manley Field House was well underway. One of the many large-scale projects that King and King completed for Syracuse University during this period, Manley was designed primarily as an indoor practice facility for the football team. Bob Secor designed the dome concept, turning against the industry standard barrel-vaulted ceilings. In 1962, it became the home for Syracuse Basketball until 1980 when the Carrier Dome opened.

1959
RUSSELL KING & ROBERT SECOR
RUSSELL KING & ROBERT SECOR

PARTNERS The late 1950’s saw two major additions to the firm. After a stint in the United States Navy, Russ King joined the firm in 1955. Bob Secor, a former Marine, was hired in 1957. In 1959, Russ King joined his father Harry and “Uncle” Curtis as a partner in the firm, which became known as King and King. The addition of Russ and Bob brought an infusion of youth and vitality to King + King that mirrored developments throughout the country as the 1960s began. This was a time of seemingly boundless prosperity, creation, growth and renewal. 

1950
S.I. NEWHOUSE SCHOOL
S.I. NEWHOUSE SCHOOL

King and King partnered with I.M. Pei to design Syracuse University’s expanded journalism school, named after the publishing magnate S.I. Newhouse. Three buildings were planned and built. Newhouse 1 was completed in 1964 utilizing the ultra-modern technique of cast-in-place concrete. In 1965, the building was named a top four honor building by the American Institute of Architects. Newhouse Dedication: History was made on several levels on August 5, 1964. President Johnson (far right) and the First Lady (left of LBJ) cut the ribbon on Newhouse 1. Harry King and I.M. Pei are visible on the left side of the photo, with Russ King on the left edge. President Johnson delivered his famous “Gulf of Tonkin” speech on campus that day, which set the stage for the escalation of the Vietnam War.

1945
F. CURTIS KING
F. CURTIS KING

PARTNER | 1945 – 1975 F. Curtis King joined the firm in 1924, the same year as his cousin Harry, both having graduated from Syracuse University. As a partner, he oversaw most of the firm’s school construction projects for Jamesville-Dewitt, Oneida, and Lafayette. He also designed Dewitt Community Church. He served as president of Syracuse Society of Architects, secretary of the Syracuse Yacht Club. He had a love of history and was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Canal Society of New York.

1938
GENERAL ICE CREAM CORPORATION BUILDING
GENERAL ICE CREAM CORPORATION BUILDING

This clipping from the Syracuse Post-Standard shows the architectural sketch, done by Harry King, for the General Ice Cream Company factory on Wilkinson Street. Completed in 1938, the factory marked the largest business investment in Syracuse since the Depression started and was crucial in solidifying Melvin L., Harry A., F. Curtis King Architect’s financial situation. Today, the Art Deco building is home to Middle Ages Brewery.

1936
PIONEER HOMES HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
PIONEER HOMES HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

King and King was commissioned to design the Pioneer Housing Project in 1936. One of the first examples of federally subsidized housing in the United States, the complex was completed in Syracuse’s 15th ward in 1938. The result of a New Deal program, the success of the project was symbolic of a city and a firm coming out of the darkest days of the Depression. Harry King designed each block of homes with a large park area to add to the quality of life for residents.

1933
NIAGARA MOHAWK BUILDING
NIAGARA MOHAWK BUILDING

An iconic example of Art Deco design both inside and out, Melvin King designed the Syracuse Lighting Company building in a consultation with Buffalo firm Bley and Lyman. It became the headquarters of Niagara-Hudson, Niagara-Mohawk, and now National Grid. By 1933, citizens referred to it as “the electric jewel”, this striking design is resplendent with shining Crucible Steel, produced in Solvay. The same steel was used in the Chrysler Building in New York City. Arranged with setbacks, black glass, helium filled lighting tubes, and topped with The Spirit of Light, this building is one of the finest examples of Art Deco design in the United States. In 2009, it was placed on the National Register.

RAINBOW LOUNGE HOTEL SYRACUSE
RAINBOW LOUNGE HOTEL SYRACUSE

The Hotel Syracuse opened in 1924, during prohibition. As a result, the hotel had no bar. In 1933, with the repeal of Prohibition, Melvin King was commissioned to design a bar for the city’s grandest hotel. He created a striking Art Moderne lounge decorated in black glass and steel that became a wildly popular spot for guests and Syracusans alike.

1932
HARRY KING
HARRY KING

PARTNER | 1932 – 1976 Harry King graduated from Syracuse University in 1924. He was a primary designer of buildings for Coca-Cola and his alma mater. He was also lead designer on several important hospital designs, including the expansion of St. Joseph’s Hospital. He assumed leadership of the firm after his father’s death. Like his father, he believed strongly in community service. He was a member of the Century Club, Syracuse Kiwanis Club, and was a member of the DeWitt Community Church (which was designed by the firm).

1906
ONONDAGA COUNTY COURTHOUSE
ONONDAGA COUNTY COURTHOUSE

Completed in 1906, this magnificent Beaux-Arts building is the apotheosis of Russell and King’s working relationship. Divided into three symmetrically arranged sections, the center section is crowned with a large copper-plated dome, anchored by four smaller domes. The main atrium is the focal point of the building, festooned with marble floors and pillars, wainscot and a magnificent gold and blue

1899
MELVIN KING
MELVIN KING

PARTNER | 1868-1946 In 1888, Melvin King came to Archimedes Russell as an unpaid apprentice and swept floors and cleared ash buckets just for an opportunity to work with “the old man” as King referred to him. After a year, King had demonstrated his commitment and Russell offered him a paying job. As the 1890’s progressed Melvin became more involved in the firm’s larger projects. In 1902, Russell was commissioned to design a new courthouse for Onondaga County. Completed in 1906, this spectacular new courthouse was the firm’s crowning achievement. Melvin King was lead designer and supervised most of the project and as a result, the “old man” made him partner, creating Russell and King in 1906. This began a period of transition, as Melvin took on more of a leadership role. He devoted much of his time to service. Melvin was president of the Central New York AIA, YWCA, and Syracuse Chamber of Commerce. He also served as president of the Syracuse grade commission during the elevation of the railroads in the 1930’s.

SYRACUSE CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL
SYRACUSE CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

The new high school, designed in 1899 to accommodate 1,500 students, was erected at the intersection of South Warren and Adams streets, south of the business district of downtown Syracuse. The total cost of the project was $428,076 (approximately $12 million today). The school operated under the name Syracuse Central High School from 1903 to 1960 and later as Syracuse Central Technical. In 1975, the school officially closed after the graduation of the senior class.

1888
CROUSE COLLEGE
CROUSE COLLEGE

One of Russell’s most iconic and revered designs, Crouse College was commissioned by Syracuse’s wealthiest citizen John Crouse, in memory of his late wife. The building was designed in the Romanesque Revival and High Gothic styles, which were very popular at the time of construction in 1888. Crouse College still stands on the SU Campus and is home to Visual and Performing Arts.

1887
HOLDEN OBSERVATORY
HOLDEN OBSERVATORY

Built in 1887, Holden Observatory is the second-oldest building on the Syracuse University campus. SU had built Holden because Chancellor Charles Sims had an interest in astronomy and coal merchant Erastus Holden had the money to make it happen. It was named in memory of Holden’s son, an 1883 SU graduate who had died of a heart ailment.

1872
PARK CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
PARK CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

The second Park Central Presbyterian Church was one of Russell’s first solo commissions and was built in 1872. At the time, the area near Fayette Park was one of the city’s most well to do and the church was surrounded by many Italianate and Greek Revival mansions, like Hamilton White’s house, which still stands next to the church.

1868
ARCHIMEDES RUSSELL
ARCHIMEDES RUSSELL

FOUNDER | PARTNER 1868 – 1915 Archimedes Russell was born in Andover, Massachusetts in 1840 to a carpenter father. At 19 he moved to Boston. After three years as an apprentice to architect John Stevens, Russell heard Syracuse was an up and coming city and contacted Rufus Rose, the only architect in the city’s directory, to inquire about a job. In his eagerness, Russell left Boston before receiving a response and he arrived in Syracuse to find Rose had moved to Chicago. Instead, in a critical twist of fate, he met another local architect Horatio Nelson White, becoming his apprentice in 1862. The rest, as they say, is history. After working closely with White on the Gridley Building in Hanover Square, Russell left White’s office and set out on his own in 1868. Archimedes could never have imagined that the firm he started as a 28-year-old would endure to become the oldest in New York State and the third oldest in the United States. A prodigious work ethic (Melvin King noted that Russell worked ten-hour days, six days a week) combined with a public spiritedness and inspired mind created not only a thriving firm, but literally helped build the city of Syracuse.